2023

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SGEM#408: Hey, I, Oh I’m Still Alive – Is it due to TXA?

The Skeptics' Guide to EM

Date: July 1, 2023 Reference: PATCH-Trauma Investigators and ANZICS Clinical Trial Group. Prehospital Tranexamic Acid for Severe Trauma. NEJM 2023. Guest Skeptic: Dr. Salim Rezaie is a community emergency physician in San Antonio, TX. He is the Creator and founder of REBEL EM, a free, critical appraisal blog that tries to cut down knowledge translation gaps of […] The post SGEM#408: Hey, I, Oh I’m Still Alive – Is it due to TXA?

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ECG Cases 45 ECG in Weakness and Neurological Symptoms

Emergency Medicine Cases

In this ECG Cases blog Dr. Jesse MacLaren guides us through 10 cases of patients who present with generalized weakness or acute neurologic symptoms and discusses how to look for ECG signs of dysrhythmias, electrolyte emergencies, acute coronary occlusion, and demand ischemia in patients with generalized weakness and in patients with neurologic symptoms, to consider predisposing factors like LVH; seizure-like activity from cardiac syncope; TIA/CVA embolic sources like atrial fibrillation or LV th

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ACMT Toxicology Visual Pearl: Poison Dart Frog

ALiEM

The toxin from the golden poison dart frog most resembles which of the following in its mechanism of action? Botulinum toxin Bufotoxin Grayanotoxin Palytoxin Tetrodotoxin Photo adapted from Wilfried Berns (Wikimedia Commons) Reveal the Answer 3. Grayanotoxin – a sodium channel opener Background The golden poison dart frog ( Phyllobates terribilis ), often considered one of the most poisonous animals on the planet, secretes onto its skin the lipophilic alkaloid batrachotoxin , which irreversibly

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Neurogenic Shock in Children

Pediatric EM Morsels

To celebrate the end of trauma season ( is it ever really over? ), we here at the Ped EM Morsels Bakery have cooked up a morsel to remind you that pediatric trauma can be even more difficult than you think. Never fear. As our fearless leader likes to say: “children are not aliens, but they are a special population with unique anatomy and physiology.” Children compensate for blood and volume loss very well… until they don’t.

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A Beginner’s Guide to Vasoactive Drug use in Children with Septic Shock

Don't Forget the Bubbles

Four-year-old Ed is being resuscitated for presumed Invasive Group A Streptococcal Sepsis from tonsilitis. He presented tachycardic and hypotensive with a capillary refill time of 5 seconds. After 40ml/kg of IV 0.9% NaCl, his HR came down a little, but the effect was short-lived. He has an HR of 190/min, and his BP is 85/35 mmHg. The CRT is unchanged.

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PATCH

The Bottom Line

In adult patients with major trauma, who are at risk for trauma-induced coagulopathy does early administration of 1g of tranexamic acid (TXA) followed by an infusion of 1g over 8 hours, compared with placebo, increase survival with a favourable functional outcome at 6 months?

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Massive hemorrhage: a very deep dive

First 10 EM

Transfusion seems like the simplest intervention in medicine. The patient is losing blood, so let’s put some back in. Not much more complicated than an oil change. Sure, you need to use a specific brand, but as long as the system is topped up, everything should run just fine. Therefore, when someone (to be left […] The post Massive hemorrhage: a very deep dive appeared first on First10EM.

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PulmCrit: New ARDS guidelines reveal a shambolic state of affairs

EMCrit Project

Within the past year, two major societies have released guidelines on ARDS: the ATS (American Thoracic Society) and the ESICM (European Society of Intensive Care Medicine). Don’t be fooled by their names – both of these organizations are fundamentally international in scope. Some authors on the ATS document were from Europe, and similarly some authors […] EMCrit Project by Josh Farkas.

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Texas Residency Program Unexpectedly Announces Closure

ACEP Now

The CHRISTUS Health-Texas A&M Spohn Emergency Medicine Residency Program announced Friday that its program will close in June 2026 after the current emergency medicine residents complete their training. An official reason for the closure was not immediately available from the hospital administration, but residents there said they were told the surprise move was likely because of financial reasons.

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Massive Haemorrhage: Science and Practice

Broome Docs

This is another lecture by the always amazing Dr Justin Morgenstern from the series of talks he delivered on his tour of Perth in September 2023. In this talk I challenged Justin to go on a very deep dive into the literature around the modern management of the massively bleeding trauma patient. What is the best way to resuscitate and replace all those blood products in these severely unwell people?

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SGEM#422: And It was all Yellow-Nasal Discharge and Antibiotics in Pediatric Sinusitis

The Skeptics' Guide to EM

Reference: Shaikh N, et al. Identifying children likely to benefit from antibiotics for acute sinusitis: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA July 2023 Date: October 17, 2023 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Alasdair Munro is a clinical research fellow specializing in pediatric infectious disease at the University of Southampton. He is currently involved with clinical trials of vaccines […] The post SGEM#422: And It was all Yellow-Nasal Discharge and Antibiotics in Pediatric Sinusitis first appeared on The Skep

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EM Quick Hits 53 Postpartum Hemorrhage, Serotonin Syndrome, TBI Herniation Syndromes, Ulcerative Colitis, Pediatric C-Spine Immobilization, Global EM

Emergency Medicine Cases

On this month's EM Quick Hits podcast: Anand Swaminathan on update to ED management of postpartum hemorrhage, Nour Khatib on serotonin syndrome and its mimics, Katie Lin on an approach to recognition and management of severe TBI and brain herniation syndromes, Hans Rosenberg on the ED management of ulcerative colitis, Heather Cary on pediatric c-spine immobilization controversies and techniques, Navpreet Sahsi on the difference between humanitarian and development work The post EM Quick Hits 53

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SAEM Clinical Images Series: Intracranial Abnormality

ALiEM

A 26-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented to the ED after slipping on wet pavement and hitting his head on the ground three hours prior. He endorsed a constant, achy 7/10 headache accompanied by nausea and photophobia. He denied vomiting, dizziness, diplopia, loss of consciousness, or seizures. Nothing made it better or worse.

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The Broselow-Luten System

Pediatric EM Morsels

Taking care of a critically ill child can be nerve-racking to say the least, and downright petrifying for those who don’t do it frequently, even if they are well-trained and brilliant clinicians. Dr. James Broselow, a family medicine-turned-emergency medicine physician from Hickory, North Carolina , recognized that his team spent a lot of time trying to calculate doses of medications rather than spending their mental energy on the actual medical decisions for the resuscitation.

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How To Read a Scientific Paper

Don't Forget the Bubbles

Read between the lines. No matter where we are or what type of medicine we practice, it is likely that we all were told at one point that we were expected to be lifelong learners. This is important as medical knowledge is constantly evolving. Dr. David Sackett, the father of evidence-based medicine, once said: I The traditional way to stay current is by reading the relevant scientific literature.

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Early and Empirical High-Dose Cryoprecipitate for Hemorrhage After Traumatic Injury

The Bottom Line

In patients with trauma and critical bleeding who require activation of a major haemorrhage protocol, does the empiric administration of 3 pools of cryoprecipitate (6g fibrinogen) within 90 minutes of randomisation (and no more than 3 hours after injury) improve survival, compared to standard care?

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A 50-something with Regular Wide Complex Tachycardia: What to do if electrical cardioversion does not work?

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

Case submitted by anonymous. Written by Smith. Ken's piece at the bottom is excellent. A 50-something presented with s udden onset palpitations 8 hrs prior while sitting at desk at work. He had concurrent sharp substernal chest pain that resolved, but palpitations continued. Over past 3 months, he has had similar intermittent episodes of sharp chest pain while running, but none at rest.

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The CT FIRST Trial: Should We Pan-CT After ROSC?

REBEL EM

Background: Achieving ROSC in out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is no easy feat but, care doesn’t end with ROSC. Post-ROSC management is nuanced and challenging but helps to ensure good outcomes. Identification of the underlying cause of the cardiac arrest is a critical area of focus in post-arrest care. Although myocardial infarction, dysrhythmias and pulmonary emboli are common pathologies to consider, there are a host of other causes including subarachnoid hemorrhage, trauma and electroly

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PulmCrit Hot Take: Steroid for severe pneumonia (CAPE COD trial)

EMCrit Project

Steroid is worthless for pneumonia! Wait, a new study shows it's beneficial! Hang on, a fresh meta-analysis shows that steroid it's useless! And wait, here's a fresh NEJM study showing mortality benefit!! This feels like a roller coaster. What's going on here? Several factors may explain this: Steroid is beneficial, but only in a subset […] EMCrit Project by Josh Farkas.

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Delayed sequence intubation: An RCT

First 10 EM

Introduced to the world by our friend Scott Weingart, delayed sequence intubation (DSI) is often summarized as procedural sedation for the procedure of preoxygenation. (Weingart 2011, Weingart 2015) It is a brilliant concept, makes a ton of sense on paper, and anecdotally has seemed to help a number of my patients. However, any long time […] The post Delayed sequence intubation: An RCT appeared first on First10EM.

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Traumatizing Patients with Trauma Activations

ACEP Now

Each time she moved her hand it caught my eye: the glint of her bejeweled fingers sharply contrasting with the spare gurney and paper-thin blanket. The fat heaviness of her rings seemed startling against her bony fingers, as if they should have shrunk in parallel with her collagen and fat. She fought against the technician removing her belongings while her protestations melded with my trauma survey.

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SGEM#415: Buckle Down for some Ultrasound to Diagnosis Distal Forearm Fractures

The Skeptics' Guide to EM

Reference: Snelling et al. Ultrasonography or radiography for suspected pediatric distal forearm fractures. New England Journal of Medicine June 2023 Date: July 19, 2023 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Casey Parker is a Rural Generalist that includes in his practice emergency medicine, anesthesia, and critical care. He is also a fully-fledged ultrasonographer. Casey currently splits his time […] The post SGEM#415: Buckle Down for some Ultrasound to Diagnosis Distal Forearm Fractures first appeared on The Ske

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Ep 187 Crashing Anaphylaxis – AMAX4 Algorithm and The Max McKenzie Case

Emergency Medicine Cases

I had the enormous honour of interviewing Dr. Ben McKenzie, EM physician and a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne studying the topic of resuscitation algorithms in anaphylaxis and asthma. The tragic death of his son Ben McKenzie at the age 15 from hypoxic respiratory arrest as a result of anaphylaxis and asthma in 2021 has led Dr. McKenzie on a mission to prevent deaths from anaphylaxis and asthma by educating emergency providers around the world using his AMAX4 algorithm as a framewor

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SAEM Clinical Images Series: Dangerous Eye Drainage

ALiEM

A 32-year-old man with a history of traumatic globe rupture from a stab wound two months ago, status post repair, presented to the emergency department for worsening right eye pain and green malodorous drainage for the past three days. These symptoms started when he got a fleck of sawdust in the right eye about four days prior to presentation, which he was able to brush out with his finger.

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Button Battery Update 3.0

Life in the Fastlane

Neil Long Button Battery Update 3.0 Want to know the latest on button battery management, prevention and immediate care? Look no further than our latest tox offering.

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Hypothermia and drowning

Don't Forget the Bubbles

A PEM adventure It’s time for another PEM adventure. Join us on another journey (with an inbuilt time travel machine) in managing Elsa, a 2-year-old girl who is a HUGE fan of the Disney movie, Frozen. Elsa was found face down in the family pool 20 minutes after last visual contact and was picked up without resuscitation. Emergency Medical Services found her apneic and pulseless.

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Scientists Grow Electrodes Inside The Body

Medgadget

Researchers at Linköping University in Sweden have developed a method whereby the body can ‘grow its own’ electrodes. The minimally invasive technique involves injecting a hydrogel that is laden with enzymes into target tissues. The enzymes interact with molecules that are present in the tissue to change the structure of the gel and allow it to become electrically conductive.

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A 50-something with chest pain.

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

This was sent by anonymous The patient is a 55-year-old male who presented to the emergency department after approximately 3 to 4 days of intermittent central boring chest pain initially responsive to nitroglycerin, but is now more constant and not responsive to nitroglycerin. It is unknown when this pain recurred and became constant. More past history: hypertension, tobacco use, coronary artery disease with two vessel PCI to the right coronary artery and circumflex artery several years prior.

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Anaphylactic Shock

REBEL EM

Anaphylactic Shock is an acute, life-threatening hypersensitivity disorder, with a generalized, rapidly evolving, multi-systemic allergic reaction (IgE-mediated disorder). If not treated rapidly can become fatal. Scott Weingart, MD put together a manual titled the Resuscitation Crisis Manual , which in short, is composed of two-page protocols for various situations that involve crashing patients.

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IBCC – ABG, VBG, and pulse oximetry

EMCrit Project

The precise utilization of ABG, VBG, and pulse oximetry remains controversial. Unfortunately, there is little high-level evidence investigating whether these interventions affect patient outcomes (for example, there is precious little evidence to support most of the target values that we're chasing after). This chapter attempts to explore the strengths, weaknesses, and indications for various techniques. […] EMCrit Project by Josh Farkas.

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No, metformin is probably not the cure for long COVID

First 10 EM

The internet is alive with rumors of a simple, cheap, low-risk cure for long COVID. Sound too good to be true? That’s because it almost certainly is. Let’s talk about this COVIT-OUT trial and what it says about metformin. The paper Bramante CT, Buse JB, Liebovitz DM, et al. Outpatient treatment of COVID-19 and incidence […] The post No, metformin is probably not the cure for long COVID appeared first on First10EM.

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Emergency Physician Climbs the Seven Summits

ACEP Now

Ben Mattingly, MD, tries to live by the adage, “One should be adventurous and daring, but not reckless.” The challenge is that the line between adventurous and reckless is often paper-thin. Take, for example, his recent expedition to Nepal to summit Mount Everest. When he arrived at the base camp, he found out three rope-fixing sherpas had just been killed in the famously dangerous Khumbu Icefall.

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SGEM#421: I Think I’d Have a Heart Attack – Maybe Not in a Rural Area?

The Skeptics' Guide to EM

Date: November 22, 2023 Reference: Stopyra et al. Delayed First Medical Contact to Reperfusion Time Increases Mortality in Rural EMS Patients with STEMI. AEM November 2023. Guest Skeptic: Dr. Lauren Westafer an Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School – Baystate. She is the cofounder of FOAMcast and a […] The post SGEM#421: I Think I’d Have a Heart Attack – Maybe Not in a Rural Area?

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Journal Club 5 Appendicitis Delay to Appendectomy – Safe?

Emergency Medicine Cases

You diagnose uncomplicated appendicitis in the ED. The on call General Surgery team wants to wait until the next morning to perform an appendectomy. Is your patient at risk for appendiceal perforation with a delay to surgery? Dr. Rohit Mohindra and Dr. Shelley McLeod analyze the latest RCT that attempts to answer this question, the PERFECT study, on this EM Cases Journal Club.

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SAEM Clinical Images Series: Pediatric Genitourinary Bleeding

ALiEM

A 4-year-old female with no significant past medical history is brought to the Emergency Department by her grandmother for concern for two days of progressive vaginal bleeding. The grandmother first noted blood in the patient’s underwear the previous morning when she was helping the patient wipe and she noticed it again prior to arrival, this time saturating the patient’s underwear.

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AI Prompting Techniques

Life in the Fastlane

Sheralyn Guilleminot and Mike Cadogan AI Prompting Techniques 4 AI Prompting Techniques to Help You Stay Ahead in Medicine. AI prompting techniques are the key to using artificial intelligence efficiently and getting usable output.

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TXA in head injuries

Don't Forget the Bubbles

A PEM adventure Meet Polly, a 6-year-old girl with a penchant for shopping. Besides a few febrile convulsions when she was two, she’s a healthy 6-year-old. Having just bought the most gorgeous pair of red ballet pumps that would go delightfully with the red bow she bought in Harrods last week, she was skipping down Regent’s Street with her nanny. As they crossed the front of Liberty, a huge letter L came plummeting down, crashing in front of her.

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